Stock Market: US, NATO vs. Russia Tensions Over Ukraine Cause Jitters Globally

by GoNews Desk 4 months ago Views 3532

Ukraine Conflict Russia USA NATO Global Stock Mark
The share market continues to be under pressure today, with Sensex having touched a low of 56,962.73 points at 11 AM today before recovering to 57,223.19, but at present it is still under its previous close of 57,491.51. Similarly, Nifty is also trading below its previous close of 17,149.10 and is presently at 17,074.25.

One of the factors behind the fall in markets is the prevailing tension between the US-led NATO alliance and Russia, with both sides building up troop presence in Ukraine’s eastern and southern flanks. This has spooked investors around the world, and combined with a strict monetary policy globally, has led to a tumble in stock markets.


The NATO announced yesterday on Monday that has deployed additional troops, ships, and planes and has kept them in standby in Eastern Europe. It claims that Russia is amassing a troop presence in the region to “annexe” Ukraine through an invasion.

International news agency Reuters says that this is a major reason for the fall in share markets globally. The largest index on the MSCI has seen a decline of 1.2% which is the lowest level in a month. Japan’s Nekkei share average closed 2.88% lower, its lowest level in six months.

Similarly, Hong Kong share market saw a 1.64% dip and Korea’s KOSPI declined by 1.67%. Australian benchmark indices also fell by 2.73% and closed at an eight-month low, although inflation is also a reason for the same. Investors believe that these climbdowns in the market are due to geopolitical factors which has affected the outflow of foreign funds and increased the price of crude oil.

Another reason for the falls registered in global markets is the US Federal Reserve’s upcoming meeting on 25th-26th January, where it is expected to formulate policies to reign in inflation and resultant dissatisfaction within the United States.

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