"We Will Hunt You Down": Joe Biden Speaks On Kabul Attack

by GoNews Desk 10 months ago Views 1370

Biden and the U.S. military leadership have stated on many occasions that the evacuations out of Afghanistan will continue. The bombing came after multiple warnings from intelligence agencies, and is likely to increase the pressure on the already stressed evacuation procedure.

US President Address Kabul Attack
After the twin bomb attacks at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, U.S. President Joe Biden addressed the nation today. The attack has been claimed by the ISIS-K, a regional manifestation of the terror group Islamic State. The ISIS-K is hostile to the Taliban.

The United States lost 13 military personnel in the attack, which has killed at least 90 people on site. President Joe Biden condemned the attack and vowed retaliation in strong terms: “Know this: We will not forgive. We will not forget. We will hunt you down and make you pay". He said that he was “outraged and heartbroken” along with the country. U.S. retaliation would come, he said, “at the moment of our choosing”.


Biden and the U.S. military leadership have stated on many occasions that the evacuations out of Afghanistan will continue. The bombing came after multiple warnings from intelligence agencies, and is likely to increase the pressure on the already stressed evacuation procedure.

The Taliban has also joined in on the condemnation of the attack. Its spokesperson said that “The Islamic Emirate strongly condemns the bombing of civilians at Kabul Airport”. The group also added that the Taliban had lost more people than the United States in the blast.

When questioned by reporters as to the decision to allow Taliban to secure the perimeter of the airport, the American president said that they are not “good guys” but the United States is counting on their own self-interests. He said that it is in the Taliban’s interests to allow safe evacuations within the deadline of August 31. He said: “There is no evidence thus far… that there has been collusion between the Taliban and ISIS in carrying out what happened today… and what is expected to continue beyond today”

People Boarding Australian Air Force Plane. Photo: REUTERS

The frantic evacuations from the airport have increased the security burden on site and increased tensions in the area, leaving it vulnerable to an attack. The Taliban is attempting to quell the chaos by assuring normalcy and safety, but people still remain keen on fleeing from Afghanistan. Earlier, the U.S. Secretary of State had said that “diplomatic” and other measures would be used to ensure that civilian flights out of Kabul can continue after the August 31 deadline.

The United States has limited options in the scenario and Biden has made it clear that their withdrawal from the country is non-negotiable: “we will not be deterred by terrorists”. He illustrated the dangers of the mission by using the bombing as an instance, and justified the rushed troop pull-out as the safest course instead of extending the deadline.

 

Meanwhile, Australia and New Zealand have ceased their evacuation operations. New Zealand PM Jacinda Arendt said in a statement on the blast: “We strongly condemn what is a despicable attack on many innocent families and individuals who were simply seeking safety from the incredibly difficult and fragile situation in Afghanistan.

After all its troops had been evacuated from Afghanistan, Australian PM Scott Morrison said: "Our plan now moves into its post-evacuation stage and that involves ensuring the process of returning, through our official humanitarian programme” which means that evacuation plans for Afghan nationals, especially collaborators, would cease. Many politicians, officials, and servicepersons have expressed opposition and frustration against their leaderships’ decision to stop evacuations as they believe it amounts to “abandoning” those who helped them to the Taliban, who have allegedly been retaliating violently against such people.  

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